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THE JOURNEY FROM PLATFORM NINE AND THREE-QUARTERS

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  7. Describe a journey you went on.

I. Vocabulary to the chapter:

keep to – оставаться (в каком-л. месте)

to keep at home /indoors, with in doors/ – сидеть дома

hoover ['hu:vq] v – разг. пылесосить; чистить пылесосом

grunt [grAnt] v – хрюкать, ворчать

puncture ['pANktSq] v – приводить в негодность,

to puncture a scheme – сорвать план

ruddy ['rAdI] a – румяный, сл. проклятый

you ruddy liar! – ты, проклятый лгун!

mutter ['mAtq] v – бормотать

to mutter to oneself – бормотать про себя

trunk [trANk] n – дорожный сундук, чемодан

pipe [paIp] v – пищать

ticket barrier – контрольный барьер железнодорожной станции

gangling ['gxNglIN] a – долговязый, нескладный

freckle ['frek(q)l] n – веснушка

a face peppered with freckles – лицо, усыпанное веснушками

jostle ['dZPs(q)l] v – толкать; теснить

trolley ['trPlI] n – тележка (разносчика)

scarlet ['skQ:lIt] n – алый, багряный цвет, багрец

wrought iron ["rO:t'aIqn] gate – кованые железные ворота

archway ['Q:tSweI] n – арка над проходом

hoot [hu:t] v – кричать, ухать (о сове)

shove [SAv] v – толкать, пихать; отталкивать

heave [hi:v] v – поднимать (с усилием)

chorus ['kO:rqs] v – говорить хором, одновременно

load [lqVd] n – pl разг. множество; обилие, избыток

loads of friends — толпа /масса/ друзей

lane [leIn] n – дорожка, тропинка (обыкн. в полях, между изгородями)

dimple ['dImpl] v – появляться о ямочках

she dimpled with laughter – на щеках у неё появились ямочки от смеха

liquorice ['lIk(q)|rIs, -rIS] n – лакричные конфеты

liquorice allsorts — лакричное ассорти

tenpin bowling ["fenpIn'bqVlIN] – кегельбан-автомат, боулинг

sidle ['saIdl] v – двигаться боком

tripe [traIp] n – требуха (кишки и т. п.)

bogey = boggy ['bPgI] n – груб. (детский) понос

sprout [spraVt] n – pl. рассада (обыкн. капустная), брюссельская капуста

nibble ['nIb(q)l] v – обгрызать; грызть

snooze [snu:z] v – разг. вздремнуть, прикорнуть

rummage ['rAmIdZ] v – рыться, искать, обыскивать

dud [dAd] n – разг. никчёмный человек; неудачник

dumbfound [dAm'faVnd] v – огорошивать, ошарашивать, ошеломлять

mean [mi:n] a – подлый, нечестный

riff-raff – шпана

rub off ['rAb'Pf] (on) phr v – отразиться, сказаться на ком-либо

knuckle ['nAk(q)l] n – сустав пальца

bob [bPb] v – качаться

turret ['tArIt] n – башенка

clamber ['klxmbq] v – карабкаться; взбираться цепляясь (за что-л.)

blissful ['blIsf(q)l] a – блаженный, счастливый

II. Give Russian equivalents of the following words and phrases:

 

  1. to tick off
  2. to pin down
  3. count down
  4. to clear one’s throat
  5. to give a lift
  6. to pace the room
  7. to dare
  8. to swing round
  9. to lean forward
  10. to gawp at somebody
  11. to blurt out
  12. to look gloomy
  13. to mess around
  14. a lumpy package
  15. to say in disgust
  16. to take smb’s mind off something
  17. to give a slight cough

 

III. Meanings of Harry Potter character names:

 

Grindelwald: The Dark Wizard whom Dumbledore defeated in 1945 takes his name from a city in Switzerland. In German, wald is "forest." Grind is a scab, as in the hardened covering over a scar; could also be grinsen, a grin or big smile. The words grindel or grendel appeared in early versions of several Germanic languages, including English. Grindan in Old English meant "to grind," and further "destroyer," someone who grinds up others. In Middle English, grindel meant "angry." In Old Norse, grindill was taken from "storm," and also meant "to bellow," or produce a loud, frightening yell. In Danish legend, the Grendel was a fearsome, murderous monster of humanoid form. He was later defeated by the Scandinavian hero Beowulf in the medieval story of the same name.

Malfoy: Draco is from the Latin word for dragon. This name is taken from mal foi, or "bad faith" in French. Lucius from the Latin for "light" (lux). Lucius was the name of several Etruscan kings, as well as part of the name of the Roman scholar Seneca. The name resembles Lucifer, the "Angel of Light." In Christian writings he rebelled against God and was later thrown into hell with his supporters, becoming Satan.



Weasley: This name could be from the world weasel, meaning (1) sneaky (2) being cowardly and running away from a situation. Or it could be from wheeze/wheezing/wheezy, meaning to breath loudly and heavily. Neither one really applies to this large wizarding family. Arthur (dad) means "a follower of Thor," the Viking god of thunder. Molly (mom) is derived from Mary, which in turn comes from Miriam, "mistress of the sea," or "bitter." Charles (Charlie, son) means "manly." William (Bill, son) means "desire to protect." Percy (son) is from the name Percival, "piercing the valley." Frederick (Fred, son) means "peace" (but this kid doesn't bring very much of it to his mom). George (son) means "farmer." Ronald (Ron, son) is from the Scandinavian form of Reynold, meaning "advice ruler," a leader who gives advice. Ginny (daughter) is from the name Virginia, meaning "virginal" or "pure."

Vincent Crabbe: His last name is probably a variation of crab, a small, round crustacean with two large claws in front, or informal English for a grumpy person. Vincent means "conqueror" or "victor."

Gregory Goyle: His last name is probably from "gargoyle," small monsters used to decorate buildings. The Gargouillealso was a legendary water monster living in the River Seine in Paris, France. The smaller gargoyles sometimes were in the Gargouille's image and were used as downspouts. Goyle's first name means "watchman," appropriate for an informal bodyguard.

Hermione Granger: Rowling first encountered "Hermione" when she saw William Shakespeare's A Winter's Tale on a school field trip. Hermione is from Greek for "earthly." A grange in British English is a countryside estate or farming complex. A granger in UK English is a manager of a grange; in U.S. English it means farmer.

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Neville Longbottom: Neville means "new town." Longbottom is a comical name, perhaps suggesting this bumbling student is chubby or has a "long bottom" that trips him up.

Hedwig: Hedwig is German for "battling." St. Hedwig (1174-1243) was the Duchess of Silesa, Germany, and wife of King Henry I. She was remembered as wise and deeply religious. She was noted for her generous assistance to Catholic monks and for unselfishly tending lepers within her kingdom. Hedwig also was responsible for starting an order of nuns who cared for orphans. She was very pious, noble, virtuous, good to the poor (to whom she gave most of her money), served the lepers. She lived a life of austerity. She entered a convent after the death of her husband. A cathedral was built to Saint Hedwig in Germany in the mid 1700’s.

Scabbers: A scab (1) is the crusty covering blood forms over a wound as it clots. This meaning could reflect the rat's battered, threadbare appearance. (2) A scab is also a worker hired to replace others who are on strike. (3) Slang for a horrible person.

 


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