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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars Still great after all these years July 5, 2003

By "dbbas"

Format:Audio CD

I first discovered this album in the late 1970s and it is still the sexiest I've ever heard. Buckley can take you to a warm place and easily wrap his seductive voice around you as he manipulates your emotions from soft and gentle (Sweet Surrender), through strong and sensual (Move With Me), to rythmic and pounding (Get On Top). No matter how many times I hear this particular album, it never seems to seem out of date.

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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars Whodo Voodoo April 1, 2007

By Murray M. Gilkeson III

Format:Audio CD

With proper promotion this could have been a huge commercial success, but then that would have spoiled the arc that Tim was on, uncompromising artistic integrity, and unrivaled talent, unnoticed and all the more powerful without the hype from Tin Pan Alley and the Under Assistant

West Coast Promo Man.

This album just flat out rocks and I wish people would quit comparing it to Jeff; it stands on its own as an authentic piece of soul music uncategorized. Personally, I never met a Buckley album that I didnt like, though some fans are still trapped in the Goodbye and Hello phase.

They have missed a lot of good music in between.

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars The soul is "grande" May 19, 2004

By Andreas

Format:Audio CD

Sweet Surrender!!! that's the song that got me into bying this album, and what a album! On "move with me" he takes me on a ride in the same vibe as the stones have. "Get on top" equally great with his sex frustrated voice in peak condition. The flow on "Hong Kong Bar" is simulair to the feeling you get from the doors "riders on the storm" and closing Make it right is dramatic as few. There is a few not so brilliant songs but mixed up with these mindblowers that just dosent matter...If you love Jeff then learn to love...

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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars The best Tim Buckley, the best late 60's rock. March 17, 1999

By A Customer

Format:Audio CD

Sweet Surrender is by far the best of Tim Buckley and Tim Buckley is the best of the late 60's.

From 'Nighthawkin' to 'Get on Top' this is one serious rockin album with a lyric that, while often harsh and adult, won't leave you wondering who snuck up behind you with a Sweet&Low enema.

Roll up the good stuff, crack open that fine vintage you been savin', sit back and enjoy. When you get to Sweet Surrender be sure to dance with your woman. You'll be gettin' lucky tonight. (If not, find yourself a new woman).

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars A must have CD August 27, 2005

By Spyridon Petropoulos

Format:Audio CD

Greetings from LA is a classic and must have album, not only for the fans of Tim Buckley but also for those who like good music. Although, it's been years since I listened to the LP for the the first times, the melody, the vocals and the greatness of tracks such as Move with me, Sweet surrender, Get on tot and Get it right remain fresch and unique.

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars he's gonna mess witcha' July 3, 2005

By Don Schmittdiel

Format:Audio CD

It's hard to know how much of the lyrical material on this disc is parody, and how much reflects Tim Buckley's own descent into a tragicly hedonistic lifestyle. Three pictures on the disc portray Buckley holding and wearing a gas mask, and a post card gives us the low-down on how temperture inversions and the presence of millions of cars combine to make Los Angelas infamous as the smog capital of the world. But is the smog merely an allegory for the trademark emphasis on hedonism that also identifies L.A., and the danger this presents to our well-being? Buckley's death from a heroin overdose three years after the release of this disc points to where his own head was turning at about this time, and perhaps his own awareness of how he was polluting his own life. But how seriously can we take any of this when Buckley closes out the disc singing "Beat me, whip me, spank me, make it right again" as the chorus to 'Make It Right'? Can he be serious? The post card on the cover requests 50 copies of the disc for the Apollo Massage Parlor since it "sounds real great to rub downs". More parody? Actually, it probably would be a great rub-down soundtrack! And on the opener, 'Move With Me', Buckley is seemingly talking about messing with another man's wife, but the chorus intones that he wants to "mess witcha, mess witcha, mess witcha mind". I get the feeling Buckley means to mess with our psyche's more than our drives. On the other hand, it's hard to argue with the blatant sexuality of 'Get On Top', and on 'Devil Eyes' we have "I got so tired of meaningful looks, I got so tired of coming up lame". Perhaps he's hinting at the symbolic, while hitting us with a ton of erotic bricks.



Aside from the question of how messed up Buckley was becoming, little else about the disc is in question. This to me is Tim Buckley's finest moment. I owned the original vinyl copy while I was in college, and was greatly taken with the funky rock tones underlying each and every song. 'Move With Me' and 'Get On Top' shake it up the best (and there were plenty of times I pulled this disc out of the liner just to hear these two songs), but every track is a toe-tapper. At this point in my life I'm much more appreciative of the quality of voice that Buckley brings to the numbers. He possesses a noticably wide octave range, and while these songs don't always offer him the opportunity to exercise his cords as much as some of his earlier folk fare did, the high and low notes struck can still be stunning. And however you might experience Buckley's voice, and whether he is being sincere or not, he always manages to at least sound sincere. Perhaps it's part of the ruse...

Even though the lyrics and Buckley's voice will capture most of your attention, there is fine back-up work from Buckley and Joe Falsia on guitars, Chuck Rainey on bass and Ed Greene on drums. While this group supplies the core instrumentation, Buckley finds room to throw in the occasional sax, piano, conga, cello, organ, violin, viola, and the Motown sound on backing vocals from Clydie King, Venetta Fields, and Lorna Maxine Willard on two tracks. Don't expect any of the soft and gentle folk tunes that dominated Buckley's 1960's work. He's sold out his Judy Collins persona for a run at Janis Joplin. Lyrics are not included in the intriguing liner, but can be had at [...] buckley

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Tim Buckley always seemed to be on the outside looking in, and this album was so far-out in its subject matter for 1972 (ironically it was recorded at Far Out Studios in Hollywood... at least that's what it says) it isn't surprising it didn't appeal to a wider audience. Not many performers took the sexual revolution to these heights before or since, whether they were serious about it or not. Whatever you might think of the conscious content however, not hearing this disc will rob you of some of the finest instrumental and vocal sounds produced in the early 1970's. Let him mess witcha' mind.

 

 

Perhaps Unintentionally Excellent Tim Buckley Album,July 15, 2013

By

Andre S. Grindle "Andre' Grindle" (Brewer Maine) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER) (REAL NAME)

This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

Up until recently I thought of Tim Buckley as a late 60's folk singer primarily. Than a little over a week ago I was in Bull Moose with my father and while looking through the vinyl he located a copy of a Tim Buckley album called Starsailor,an apparently obscure vocally free associative jazz-rock album he recorded in 1970. Did a little research of my own and it turns out that,due in part of his lack of ability to gain success with his more expansive new music he had turned to drugs and alcohol. The result was erratic live performances but,as it were he decided on a new musical direction. Since his music already had adapted strong blues and jazz influences, the next logical step would be funk. It was the beginning of the funk era after all,and artists of many kinds were getting their feet wet in the waters of the new grooves. With a new band including funk musicians such as Joe Falsia,Buddy Helm and noted jazz guitarist Chuck Rainey this follow up to Starsailor epitomized Buckley's early contributions to the funk era.

"Move With Me" and "Night Hawkin" are both two perfect Rolling Stones type soul rockers with extremely strong grooves and some slinky bass/guitar lines. "Get On Top" is a powerful piece of percussive grooving with a strong Latin rock flavor in the rhythms but,of course the bass/guitar and keyboard lines are extremely clean and melodically jazzy. "Sweet Surrender" is an absolute opus. Alternately gentle and dramatic it starts out with a pulsing,electronic type rhythm with some spacey organ effects and builds into a hugely swelling arrangement in the climax-with Tim's deep vocal gymnastics flowing right along with it all. "Devil Eyes" is heavy, right in the pocket funk-again with Buckley's vocal treatment leading the way and his trademark use during this time of his voice as an instrumental element. "Hong Kong Bar" is a tense,brooding acoustic blues type number that melodically just keeps developing as it goes along. "Make It Right" closes the album with a cinematic funky soul number that has a heavier blues variation of the Curtis Mayfield sound of the period.

Although the fact that Tim Buckley's embrace of funk is seen by many as,similar to David Bowie,reflective of his increasingly hedonistic lifestyle during this time-leading to the inevitable snide remarks of "this sounds it's from a porn film", I personally have a different take on it. Funk is musically extremely sexy music-can't and would'nt have it any other way. However funk generally celebrates the beautiful and exhilarating aspects of sexual release-as opposed to the self centered hedonistic kind. Because of Buckley's roots as a folk singer means his lyrics are very highly personally literate, he therefore puts this probing and searching prose to the most expansive end of funk-coming at the style from a jazz and Latin point of few-with rhythms,percussion and other instrumental effects that keep on moving with the abstractions that Buckley delivers on with his songwriting. If your a folk-rock admirer who is looking for a good expansion of that ethic into the funk era of the 1970's,and are not bound by the words of some closed minded writers, I highly recommend this album.

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5.0 out of 5 stars Took me back..........., June 24, 2013

By

brendan walsh - See all my reviews

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This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

although more than 30 years old, it lasts the test of time. recommend to those of the 70's music era

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars Tim Buckley cd review, January 3, 2013

By

deana urban - See all my reviews

This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

Old hard to find Tim Buckley music. Was a great gift. Sounds great Order was shipped ontime, received before chirstmas.

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5.0 out of 5 stars Greetings From LA, November 14, 2012

By

Catlin - See all my reviews

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This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

I saw Tim Buckley perform at the Keystone in Palo Alto. Considering I'd seen all the great bands of the late sixties perform, I was very impressed with his ability to use his voice like an instrument. Very rare indeed.

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5.0 out of 5 stars This is Tim Buckley, November 14, 2012

By

lauren j banker (WALLED LAKE, MI, US) - See all my reviews

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This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

I loved this Album when I was 16 - so I decided to buy the CD and go down memory lane. I feel that this is the album
Tim was born to record. It is excellent, and I would recommend this to anyone who wants to experience Tim Buckley.
If you haven't heard this, you haven't heard Tim.

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5.0 out of 5 stars I have more than 1000 CDs, this is one of the very best, August 18, 2012

By

Jim... - See all my reviews

This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

I first bought this record when it came out and they briefly played "Get On Top" on the radio in Montreal. I loved the track, but this album is so much more.
It really defies categorization. But in my opinion it is head and shoulders Tim Buckley's best record. Sometimes artists just get on a roll, and he clearly was when he made this.

If you don't know it, don't hesitate, just buy it.
Like he wrote on the liner notes, great music to rub down to.
Or to listen to while you're doing the dishes.
Or just about anytime.

This is one of those records that, if you don't like it, I wonder what might be wrong with you.

Last comment, the Amazon description calls it a live album. It isn't. But it is full of life.

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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful

2.0 out of 5 stars too raucous, June 15, 2012

By

.fgd (usa) - See all my reviews

This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

I'm a big fan but this album is a blues reincarnation that doesn't turn me on though those into white blues would?
It sounds like music for a blues dive on a Saturday Nightl out. Hearing him sing blues in ballads ( like Blue Melody or Drifting ) I know he could have put in more soul and diverse inflection.
I think Lee Underwood explained it in ( recommended) biography " Blue Melody" written by his right-hand-man guitarist when he said Tim Buckley needed money at the time to support his family. Yes eager to explore new styles but he was out to make something with a wider appeal and more commercially solvent at the time. The price he paid for an insistance on artistic freedom depressed him at times. Maybe his wife nagged him into it ..!!

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars Tim's Blazin' Best, June 5, 2012

By

SiriusB - See all my reviews

This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

Despite loving and being inspired by most of Tim's music for over 25 years, I've never been able to embrace the avant-garde self-indulgence (in my opinion) of Starsailor and Lorca. For me Greetings From L.A. is Tim's most honest album: not just in the sexual confession and longing of the lyrics, but even more so in his willingness to ROCK and have a damned good time. The whole band is clearly enjoying every minute and swings and grooves beautifully.
Music's ultimate purpose is to express the joy of the soul and Tim uninhibitedly bares and shares his here, producing one of the best soul / funk albums ever. Other reviewers have got it right - this album is an all time classic and is criminally under-appreciated.
If you're new to Tim Buckley's music, I'd say buy this and Happy Sad. Ignore the critics who insist that the avant-garde stuff is his best; get out of your head and into your hips and enjoy the muse being channelled by one of the greats at his best.

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful

2.0 out of 5 stars I'm trying to like this, August 23, 2011

By

Christopher Pike "chrispy50" (Pt. Reyes Station, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)

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This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

I love Tim Buckley, but I just don't get this album so far. It sounds like background music for a porn film, only it's played by really good musicians. I understand the era was different, but I haven't been able to find a way to groove on this album yet. I haven't given up, and, if I discover why people love this album so much, I may have to change this review.

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5.0 out of 5 stars Tim Buckley is a LEGEND, July 11, 2011

By

Robert (MIAMI, FLORIDA, US) - See all my reviews

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This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (MP3 Music)

This man should have been BIG TIME with his talent and soul he could do it all! These Soul Funk Albums he released at the end of his career are instant classics, I like them so much I purchased on the spot! He could do it all folk and upgraded to funk! To bad there is no real talent out today, but to me Tim is new music for me and I love it!

 

 


Forget two things: everything you think you know about Tim Buckley, and everything the critics have told you about this album.

Actually, let me take that first comment back, or at least qualify it: you probably know Buckley had one of the best voices in rock. He could lilt babies to sleep with his early folk, but once he got into the avant-gaurd, he could wale and fly into deep space in octives only Robert Plant could then compete with. Here, this has not changed a bit. His soaring voice adds to the subject matter here--in fact it is taylor cut for this.

But on Greetings From LA, Buckley is not lighting any purest candle for any vagabond. This is the 1970s, and the bard has cut his curls and is on the strip, on the hunt. Morning Glory? Who cares.

Greetings from LA is about the night. About when 1960s free love became 1970s pleasure hunt. He is only lighting the candle for the "b*i-t-c---h dog in heat" described on "Get On Top." (And I am being conservitive in the lyric qoutes, just to get this published.)

All this is done to a deep, exotic, popping funk, provided by the best in the business: Chuck Rainey and many other funky associates. These were THE guys to get if making jazz or funk or both in the 70s. (It seems every fourth or fifth album I love, Rainey is on it. A good penny.)

These songs are long, girating canvases, played perefectly by these amazing musicians. This is funk, not disco, but it is amazing how hard the beat is driven, yet how musically it is played. The opener is blues funk. "Get On Top" works as proto-dance music. "Sweet Surrender" is exotic, middle eastern, a slow naughty satin burn--the stuff of your knuckle rapping top-bottoned school teacher's most pleasent dreams.

Buckely had of course dealt with intimacy before: "Gypsy Women" for example. But this was the stuff of the kids bathing in creeks at Woodstock in 1969, not in the 1974 key clubs. The mileu is ENTIERLY different. What is Buckley up to?

Is he exploring the freedom those kids at Woodstock faught for? Is he documenting what was then current behavior--a failed 1967 utopia turned into a 1974 free for all, armed with a gas mask? Or is he just being as naughty as he wants because he wants to? Because he now can and its fun?

Well,its hard to tell, but no doubt that the music is sure as hell great--some of the best funk out there.

That alone makes this worth getting

.

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5.0 out of 5 stars Greetings from L.A., October 25, 2009

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InspectorClu "Clu" (B.C., Canada) - See all my reviews

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This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

This is a great Tim Buckley CD it has great memories for me too. It's pretty sexual without the common 4 letter words and blatont exploitations.

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5.0 out of 5 stars Greetings from LA, July 20, 2009

By

R. L. Foster "Juliya48d" (Lansing, Mi USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)

This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

This is one of the best rare recordings of TiM Buckley's career. The shipping and handling of this product was excellent. I recommend this product and shipper for all purchases.

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5.0 out of 5 stars GREETINGS FROM L.A. BY TIM BUCKLEY,February 6, 2009

By

Marian M. Gaudet (SALEM, MA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)

This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

THE MUSIC IS AWESOME!!! I AM SOOOO PLEASED WITH THIS CD. I WOULD DEFINITELY RECOMMEND TO A FRIEND!!!

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5.0 out of 5 stars passion, August 8, 2008

By

Karen "littlefrieda" (Lyons, MI USA) - See all my reviews

This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

Greetings from L.A. is an old friend that never disappoints. Full of fun, passion, angst and just the right amount of naughty bits. The driving beats, the heartbreaking melodies and the murky back alley atmosphere Tim delivers is a time and place to be visited and celebrated again and again.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful

4.0 out of 5 stars Buckley's "get screwed" to his label is still a fine release for fans, July 15, 2008

By

Christopher Culver - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER) (REAL NAME)

This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

In 1970 Tim Buckley, then known mainly as a young folk singer, released an album called STARSAILOR. It was a stunning exploration of avant-garde timbres beyond even a lot of free jazz, with Buckley's powerful voice soaring to spacy highs or dropping down to infernal lows, and it bombed horribly (recognition coming only after his death in 1975). Furious at record labels that refused to adequately promote his original stylings, Buckley recorded GREETINGS FROM L.A in 1972. This album was intended as a middle-finger to the industry, but it's surprisingly good.

The controversial element Buckley put into GREETINGS FROM L.A. is sex, and lots of it. Nearly every song here is sleaze, whether Buckley is telling of a girl he met at the "meat-rack tavern" in "Move with Me", leaving his lover for a sex fiend in "Sweet Surrender", or screaming "Beat me, whip me, spank me / Mamma, make it right again" on the album closer "Make it Right". Even though Buckley wrote songs that are just what the masses want pandered to them, the album was certainly not intended as a sell-out attempt: it was generally all too risque for 1970s radio airplay. The lyrics are mainly ridiculous, though one could try to the songs together them as some kind of concept album storyline with a sex addict's descent into madness. And the musicianship, especially Joe Falsia on guitar, is often quite lame. Nonetheless, Buckley's voice makes this an affair very much worth hearing. Though his singing is less ethereal than on STARSAILOR, it remains strong and retains its wide range and control.

If you are not familiar with Tim Buckley's work, try the excellent Rhino compilation MORNING GLORY. Those who have embarked on collecting his individual albums will find this, after STARSAILOR, one of the first to pick up.

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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars Whodo Voodoo, April 1, 2007

By

Murray M. Gilkeson III (CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)

This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

With proper promotion this could have been a huge commercial success, but then that would have spoiled the arc that Tim was on, uncompromising artistic integrity, and unrivaled talent, unnoticed and all the more powerful without the hype from Tin Pan Alley and the Under Assistant

West Coast Promo Man.

This album just flat out rocks and I wish people would quit comparing it to Jeff; it stands on its own as an authentic piece of soul music uncategorized. Personally, I never met a Buckley album that I didnt like, though some fans are still trapped in the Goodbye and Hello phase.

They have missed a lot of good music in between.

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars The best driving down the street with the top down music, May 31, 2006

By

J. Lawrence - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)

This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

this is the kind of music that you play so loud you blow out your speakers. You cannot help but dance. Back in the early 70's we shared this album between three apartments and it still takes me back to those days..... Ah yes, Sweet Surrender all over again.

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars A must have CD, August 27, 2005

By

Spyridon Petropoulos "fangio57" (Greece) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)

This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

Greetings from LA is a classic and must have album, not only for the fans of Tim Buckley but also for those who like good music. Although, it's been years since I listened to the LP for the the first times, the melody, the vocals and the greatness of tracks such as Move with me, Sweet surrender, Get on tot and Get it right remain fresh and unique.

 


It's hard to know how much of the lyrical material on this disc is parody, and how much reflects Tim Buckley's own descent into a tragicly hedonistic lifestyle. Three pictures on the disc portray Buckley holding and wearing a gas mask, and a post card gives us the low-down on how temperture inversions and the presence of millions of cars combine to make Los Angelas infamous as the smog capital of the world. But is the smog merely an allegory for the trademark emphasis on hedonism that also identifies L.A., and the danger this presents to our well-being? Buckley's death from a heroin overdose three years after the release of this disc points to where his own head was turning at about this time, and perhaps his own awareness of how he was polluting his own life. But how seriously can we take any of this when Buckley closes out the disc singing "Beat me, whip me, spank me, make it right again" as the chorus to 'Make It Right'? Can he be serious? The post card on the cover requests 50 copies of the disc for the Apollo Massage Parlor since it "sounds real great to rub downs". More parody? Actually, it probably would be a great rub-down soundtrack! And on the opener, 'Move With Me', Buckley is seemingly talking about messing with another man's wife, but the chorus intones that he wants to "mess witcha, mess witcha, mess witcha mind". I get the feeling Buckley means to mess with our psyche's more than our drives. On the other hand, it's hard to argue with the blatant sexuality of 'Get On Top', and on 'Devil Eyes' we have "I got so tired of meaningful looks, I got so tired of coming up lame". Perhaps he's hinting at the symbolic, while hitting us with a ton of erotic bricks.

Aside from the question of how messed up Buckley was becoming, little else about the disc is in question. This to me is Tim Buckley's finest moment. I owned the original vinyl copy while I was in college, and was greatly taken with the funky rock tones underlying each and every song. 'Move With Me' and 'Get On Top' shake it up the best (and there were plenty of times I pulled this disc out of the liner just to hear these two songs), but every track is a toe-tapper. At this point in my life I'm much more appreciative of the quality of voice that Buckley brings to the numbers. He possesses a noticably wide octave range, and while these songs don't always offer him the opportunity to exercise his cords as much as some of his earlier folk fare did, the high and low notes struck can still be stunning. And however you might experience Buckley's voice, and whether he is being sincere or not, he always manages to at least sound sincere. Perhaps it's part of the ruse...

Even though the lyrics and Buckley's voice will capture most of your attention, there is fine back-up work from Buckley and Joe Falsia on guitars, Chuck Rainey on bass and Ed Greene on drums. While this group supplies the core instrumentation, Buckley finds room to throw in the occasional sax, piano, conga, cello, organ, violin, viola, and the Motown sound on backing vocals from Clydie King, Venetta Fields, and Lorna Maxine Willard on two tracks. Don't expect any of the soft and gentle folk tunes that dominated Buckley's 1960's work. He's sold out his Judy Collins persona for a run at Janis Joplin. Lyrics are not included in the intriguing liner, but can be had at [...] buckley

Tim Buckley always seemed to be on the outside looking in, and this album was so far-out in its subject matter for 1972 (ironically it was recorded at Far Out Studios in Hollywood... at least that's what it says) it isn't surprising it didn't appeal to a wider audience. Not many performers took the sexual revolution to these heights before or since, whether they were serious about it or not. Whatever you might think of the conscious content however, not hearing this disc will rob you of some of the finest instrumental and vocal sounds produced in the early 1970's. Let him mess witcha' mind.

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41 of 42 people found the following review helpful

5.0 out of 5 stars he's gonna mess witcha, December 26, 2004

By

Don Schmittdiel "running_man" (Clinton Twp., MI) - See all my reviews

This review is from: Greetings From L.A. (Audio CD)

It's hard to know how much of the lyrical material on this disc is parody, and how much reflects Tim Buckley's own descent into a tragicly hedonistic lifestyle. Three pictures on the disc portray Buckley holding and wearing a gas mask, and a post card gives us the low-down on how temperture inversions and the presence of millions of cars combine to make Los Angelas infamous as the smog capital of the world. But is the smog merely an allegory for the trademark emphasis on hedonism that also identifies L.A., and the danger this presents to our well-being? Buckley's death from a heroin overdose three years after the release of this disc points to where his own head was turning at about this time, and perhaps his own awareness of how he was polluting his own life. But how seriously can we take any of this when Buckley closes out the disc singing "Beat me, whip me, spank me, make it right again" as the chorus to 'Make It Right'? Can he be serious? The post card on the cover requests 50 copies of the disc for the Apollo Massage Parlor since it "sounds real great to rub downs". More parody? Actually, it probably would be a great rub-down soundtrack! And on the opener, 'Move With Me', Buckley is seemingly talking about messing with another man's wife, but the chorus intones that he wants to "mess witcha, mess witcha, mess witcha mind". I get the feeling Buckley means to mess with our psyche's more than our drives. On the other hand, it's hard to argue with the blatant sexuality of 'Get On Top', and on 'Devil Eyes' we have "I got so tired of meaningful looks, I got so tired of coming up lame". Perhaps he's hinting at the symbolic, while hitting us with a ton of erotic bricks.

Aside from the question of how messed up Buckley was becoming, little else about the disc is in question. This to me is Tim Buckley's finest moment. I owned the original vinyl copy while I was in college, and was greatly taken with the funky rock tones underlying each and every song. 'Move With Me' and 'Get On Top' shake it up the best (and there were plenty of times I pulled this disc out of the liner just to hear these two songs), but every track is a toe-tapper. At this point in my life I'm much more appreciative of the quality of voice that Buckley brings to the numbers. He possesses a noticably wide octave range, and while these songs don't always offer him the opportunity to exercise his cords as much as some of his earlier folk fare did, the high and low notes struck can still be stunning. And however you might experience Buckley's voice, and whether he is being sincere or not, he always manages to at least sound sincere. Perhaps it's part of the ruse...

Even though the lyrics and Buckley's voice will capture most of your attention, there is fine back-up work from Buckley and Joe Falsia on guitars, Chuck Rainey on bass and Ed Greene on drums. While this group supplies the core instrumentation, Buckley finds room to throw in the occasional sax, piano, conga, cello, organ, violin, viola, and the Motown sound on backing vocals from Clydie King, Venetta Fields, and Lorna Maxine Willard on two tracks. Don't expect any of the soft and gentle folk tunes that dominated Buckley's 1960's work. He's sold out his Judy Collins persona for a run at Janis Joplin. Lyrics are not included in the intriguing liner, but can be had at [...] buckley

Tim Buckley always seemed to be on the outside looking in, and this album was so far-out in its subject matter for 1972 (ironically it was recorded at Far Out Studios in Hollywood... at least that's what it says) it isn't surprising it didn't appeal to a wider audience. Not many performers took the sexual revolution to these heights before or since, whether they were serious about it or not. Whatever you might think of the conscious content however, not hearing this disc will rob you of some of the finest instrumental and vocal sounds produced in the early 1970's. Let him mess witcha mind.


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